Category Archives: Political

Straya Stuff: The Melbarn-Sydney Rivalry

841174_1400268440227556_1752719953_o

Breaking news: http://www.chaser.com.au/2016/melbourne-man-visits-sydney-just-point-flaws/

The “Melbarn-Sydney Rivalry” only exists in the heads of certain people from Melbarn. Usually, people from Sydney that I meet, like Melbarn a lot.

Commonly heard in Sydney: “I love Melbarn! People there are so friendly. I love the little bars and restaurants. The food is great. The roads seem easier to get around. Wish I could move there one day but I don’t know if I can. I’ll probably miss the beaches.”

Commonly heard in Melbarn: “I HATE Shitney! OMG people there are so PRETENTIOUS! Melbarn is the most LIVEABLE city in the world!!! THE BEST IN THE WORRLLLD!!! THE BEST COFFEE!!!! AND FASHIONNN!!!! AND CULTUURRREEEE!!! AND ITS THE SPORTING CAPITAL!!! THE BESSSSSSTTTTTTTTTT!!!!!! HNNNNNGGGGGGGGGGG!!!!!!”

Advertisements

Follow the Money… Corruption is Cheap

Ebola

Read this article: http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/health-and-wellbeing/nutrition/how-the-sugar-industry-shifted-blame-to-fat-20160912-greutt.html

When something doesn’t seem quite right, follow the money trail… $$$

Apparently, it only took paying around $50k of today’s money to an academic of one of the most well-regarded educational institutions in the world, to corrupt the global scientific consensus, warp the food industry, misdirect the “healthcare” and medical industry, and led generations, and many hundreds of millions of people into an obesity crisis.

From a capitalist perspective, the sugar industry and the “healthcare” industry have the perfect market; the possibility of almost every human on earth being highly addicted to a cheap, legal substance, leading to a raft of chronic diseases in many major body systems that require ongoing care and treatment, which produces consistent and ever expanding revenue streams. It is much like smoking or alcohol, but FAR more insidious and destructive. Nobody has gone to jail over this, yet we have a lifestyle disease “epidemic” that has probably led to the premature deaths of millions, with related consequential chronic illness overriding the “healthcare systems” of the “developed” world.

Don’t ever hold the “scientific method” to such high regard as to think that whatever you are told to be commonly accepted by research is completely infallible. Do your own research before worshipping the findings of someone else like it is some sort of deity. Educate yourself. Find your own truth, as much as you possibly can, for the good of society. We have all the resources to do that. There is plenty of corrupt research around.

“For many decades health authorities encouraged Americans to improve their health by reducing their fat intake, which led many people to consume low-fat, high-sugar foods that some experts now blame for fuelling the obesity crisis.”

“Marion Nestle, a professor of nutrition, food studies and public health at New York University, wrote an editorial accompanying the new paper that said the documents provided “compelling evidence” that the sugar industry initiated research “expressly to exonerate sugar as a major risk factor for coronary heart disease.”

“Race, Shame and Self-defence” by Sam Yang

I love Sam Yang‘s blog. He writes very interesting and thoughtful articles. This article discusses the subtle and poorly understood social challenges of being part of a minority group in the colonial mentality of the anglosphere, and perspectives on the racial hierarchy. Well worth a read.

13063116_481403738720190_8695699100340735515_o
#racerelations #race #racism #colonialism #martialarts
 
On survival:
“Martial arts work in isolated situations, but when the danger is systemic, then one must hold on to the principles, rather than the physical techniques. When fighting perceptions, there is no solitary “bad guy” to defeat.”
 
On understanding the perspective of a minority:
“Because if you are at the top of the institutional food chain, you may not sense the same dangers. That is good for you, but you are not the whole of the collective experience.”
 
On racial biases and stereotyping:
“Often people will relate to us in the only ways they know how, they relate to us based on our race — as if we were the representative of a whole people and not individuals.”
 
On falsely imagining racial diversity:
“The two common types I have found in the US are, liberal and conservative, and everything must fit into one or the other, no overlap. Everything then becomes mutually exclusive. Racial diversity is often tossed into the liberal bin, so people assume if a city is liberal, it must have racial diversity.”
 
On false equivalence in “reverse racism”:
“There is a difference between being bullied and institutional oppression. There is common ground but thinking it is exactly the same is a false equivalence.”
 
On recognising the differences between equality and equity:
“We cannot close that gap if we pretend things are the same. If two people run at the same speed, the person who started out in the lead will stay in the lead. To catch up, the person in the back will have to run twice as hard. Equality is nothing without equity. These are not complicated ideas; we can float these thoughts in our heads. We just may not want to if it does not work out in our favor. A quality of a civilized culture is that of empathy. Survival of the fittest is natural, but it is also primitive. The very existence of medicine is a challenge to the survival of the fittest, yet a civilized society means giving everyone a chance at life. That is what civilization is consistently working towards.”
 
On dealing with an inescapable reality:
“Race is one of those identifiers that is immutable — people will just know, which makes it the hardest thing to see past.”
 
On oversimplified racial stereotypes:
“Simplifying a minority group as always “good” or right, is exchanging paternalism with infantilization. It is reducing a group to a stereotype when there is a wholeness to people. Some people are good, some are not, some are right, some are wrong — the same wholeness that exists for the majority group.”

STAYING OUT OF HOSPITAL

This is in response to this article published on news.com.au

I always say, there are four main overarching reasons to end up in hospital, often a combination of these:
1) Elderly
2) Obesity
3) Foolish
4) Unlucky

Unfortunately for some, for whatever reasons (genetics, some unique circumstances or environmental exposure or who knows), they can do everything in their power and still get sick, like this poor man, who falls into the least common category of being exquisitely unlucky.

But the message here is not that we shouldn’t bother; because there are still plenty of other of ways in which we can end up in hospital, through aging poorly, eating poorly, gaining excessive weight and negatively affecting our body composition, or doing something stupid like getting addicted to drugs/alcohol/cigarettes or jumping off a roof while we’re drunk.

This man is in hospital by fate of misfortune; but his fellow hospital mates are there by their own design, and he is not impressed.

The point is, as expressed in the disgust this man has for his fellow patients: though on rare occasions sickness can’t be avoided, in the case of the 99.99999% of other reasons that it can be avoided, we should put in the effort and do the right things to stay out of the hospital. Because in the vast majority of the time it can be avoided, and thus we should not take our health for granted.

It is to the benefit of ourselves, and to our fellow man by the examples we set and the community resources we save by not ending up in hospital, that we do our best, within reason, to maintain as high a level of health as we can.

475682-f2ddb5d6-d407-11e3-b5be-ec06717bccf7