Category Archives: Functional Training

Real Health vs Western Medicine

In response to the article “The Healthiest Old Person on the Planet.

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Real health lies in optimising the vastly under-utilized, yet essential and natural areas of diet and fitness, not western medicine, which should ideally be reserved primarily for dealing with circumstances of last resort, and less as a system of sustaining chronic illness. There is a significant lack of interest in implementing preventive lifestyle measures in public health and correcting the overall physical robustness of the population.

I’ve worked on my diet, worked on getting as functionally fit as possible, worked on correcting my posture, worked on correcting psychological issues, and worked on improving the quality of my social circle and environment over the last few years, among other things. I recently had an eye test, my eyesight has improved slightly. I look as young or younger than I did ten years ago. I am a superior being to what I was before.

In our most basic state, we are merely animals with opposable thumbs and slightly thicker cerebral cortexes; we must respect our primitive nature, and connection to nature, in order to maximise our potential. The key factors essential to our health, at the centre of our primitive nature, is how we connect to our sources of food, and the mobility of our physical bodies.

‪#‎Health‬ ‪#‎diet‬ ‪#‎fitness‬ ‪#‎ageing‬ ‪#‎westernmedicine‬ ‪#‎preventivehealth‬‪#‎personaldevelopment‬ ‪#‎selfimprovement‬

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My Experience with SMR: Self Myofascial Release

Proper use of SMR has beneficial effects on mobility through two theoretical modes of action:

1) Mechanically allowing lengthening of fascial sheaths and muscle fibres through breaking down localised adhesions and contractures
2) Neurologically resetting the length-tension relationships of muscles and reducing the activation of the muscle stretch reflex.

SMR is not well understood by most gym goers but is beneficial if used regularly before and after workouts, or at any time of the day. It can be very useful specifically for postural correction, a common issue with modern office workers and students who spend their days hunched over a desk for hours.

There are a number of different foam rollers and trigger point balls available on the market at present. I would recommend starting with a less dense/firm roller and progressing to something more firm as your body adapts.

The roller pictured below appears intimidating but it is the highest density roller I have found, and I have worked up from softer ones to using this effectively!

SMR has been an instrumental tool in my scoliosis rehab and sporting endeavours, and helped me immensely in correction of muscular imbalances through regular daily use.

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THE BASICS: DEALING WITH MUSCLE TIGHTNESS – RECIPROCAL INHIBITION AT WORK.

I normally have a tight pec minor and bicep on one side (“Deep Front Arm Line” in myofascial train theory). I did some simple tricep activation on that side (it’s usually switched off), and the tension was reduced significantly.

Hence the lesson is: we need a combination of appropriate neurological activation as well as myofascial techniques in order to create balanced muscular activation and optimal functional movement throughout the body.

Myofascial tension is a consequence of both mechanical/structural effects as well as neurological factors.